How to Make Sales at Email Signup

A year and a half ago, remodeling and construction guru Tim Carter heard a very powerful piece of advice.

Recognizing the idea’s potential, Tim went home and immediately put it into action. That action has added thousands of dollars to his yearly revenue ever since.

The change Tim made was very simple. It can be done by any email marketer with something to sell, an e-commerce site and a few hours.

If this is you, then starting today, you can have the same results as Tim. Keep reading to find out how!

The Page That Tim Built

The Page That Tim Built

“My advice is to absolutely have something to sell at the confirmation page,” says Tim. “It’s free money. You have the person’s TRUST and attention at that point. Leverage it to the hilt.”

Tim knows what he’s talking about. In April 2009, he heard AWeber CEO Tom Kulzer recommend the confirmation page as an ideal sales opportunity. People who have arrived on that page have signed up for your emails, Tom explained, so they’re clearly interested in the brand.

So Tim went home and changed the email sign-up process on his web site, AsktheBuilder.com. After new subscribers confirmed their subscriptions, they encountered an offer for checklists that would guide them through their home-improvement projects.

Tim made things simpler by selling checklists he already had available. In order to make sales on that page, though, he needed subscribers to feel a sense of urgency. So he grouped the checklists into bundles and slashed the price for a one-time-only discount of 80% off.

TCarter Conf Offer

“We started to get sales almost immediately,” says Tim. “I’m sure within days of posting it, I had a sale. Lately we’ve been getting one or two sales a day just as the sun shines.”

With a $30 product selling at this rate over the past 16 months, Tim’s profits – just from his confirmation page – have climbed to over $11,000.

And he’s finding ways to make them climb even higher…

A Blueprint for Expanding Your Sales

A Blueprint for Expanding Your Sales

Frame The Offer With Relevance

Because construction projects tend to depend on the weather, Tim switches his offer out seasonally.

“In spring and summer, we offer a bundled package of my checklists that have to do with exterior projects in the home,” he explains. “Then in the fall and winter we switch to a bundled package of interior projects.”

Can you make your offer stronger by tweaking it for a season? A holiday? A sports event?

Try Different Floor Plans

Because there’s always room for improvement, Tim is now testing an upgraded offer. Instead of being presented with one bundle that may or may not fit their needs, new subscribers can choose from a selection of three.

Like Tim, you may want to offer your subscribers more options to increase the odds that they’ll find something they need. Or you may want to rotate offers to see what works best. What makes the most sense for your products and your customers?

Expand Your House Into a Neighborhood

If you have more than one list, don’t sell to just one. Put an offer on every confirmation page. Just make sure each offer is relevant to each set of subscribers.

“We are starting up a new list for www.StainSolver.com,” Tim says, “and we absolutely will have an offer for those who sign up for that list.”

Hang Caution Tape

Subscribers to your free newsletter may be confused by dollar signs on the confirmation page. If they think they’re required to pay, they may feel upset.

You can keep them calm with some clear communication. First, confirm that their subscription did indeed go through (for free!)

Then, make it clear that while they’re already getting your emails, you’ve have a little something else that you think they might appreciate…

And introduce the item for sale.

Now, You Wear the Hard Hat

Now, You Wear the Hard Hat

As we’ve seen, an offer at confirmation can channel a steady stream of sales.

But some marketers might argue that by selling on the confirmation page, you’ve waited until the subscriber has confirmed, which could take hours or days.

The thank-you page, they might say, makes more sense. Pitch your sale as soon as you can, while the reasons they subscribed are fresh in new subscribers’ minds.

What do you think?